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Ready to spend this fall in Vermont? If so then you’ve come to the right place, my fall-loving friend!

I mean, not only is Vermont in the fall totes magotes awesome (fall foliage much?) but I’ve spent nearly every fall of my natural born life in this beyond gorg state. 

Yeah, my dad has a house on the New York side of Lake Champlain. Therefore, I’ve been spending fall in Vermont/upstate New York for as long as I can remember.

Or, 30+ years if you need a more, semi-exact date. And you know what? I’ve never ever gotten bored since there are tons of fun things to do in Vermont. 

Anyway, what I’m trying to say is that I REALLY do know what I’m talking about when it comes to spending fall in Vermont. 

So, throughout the course of this mildly long post, I’m going to share all of my super-secret, insider tips on:

  • Fall in Vermont Weather
  • What is the Best Time to See Fall Foliage in Vermont?
  • Where Should I Go in Vermont in the Fall?
  • How to Get to Vermont in Fall
  • What to Pack for Vermont in the Fall
  • Top Things to do this Fall in Vermont
  • Where to Stay this Fall in Vermont
  • Where to Eat this Fall in NYC
  • Additional Vermont Travel Resources You’ll Love

And so much more. So, grab a jug of Vermont maple syrup and start donning your favorite red flannel shirt because we’re about to swan dive into this post all about fall in Vermont. 

This post may contain affiliate links. Please see my disclosure for more information. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a small commission from qualifying purchases.

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Fall in Vermont weather: What is Fall Like in Vermont?

Vibrant fall foliage in beautiful Manchester Vermont

If you’re planning to spend fall in Vermont then you’re probably wondering, what is fall like in Vermont anyway?

Well, that is a fantabulous question since you don’t really want to get all the way there just to totally freeze your ass off. 

But, before you prepare for Vermont in the fall, you kind of need to know when the hell fall in Vermont actually is.

So, for anyone who doesn’t live in an area with four seasons (or who is from the southern hemisphere), fall in Vermont typically runs from September 22nd through December 21st.  

That being said, I personally feel like fall in Vermont ends before Thanksgiving. After that, depending on where you are in the state, it can get hella cold and snowy as winter rolls into town.

So, if you can, try to visit between late September and early November. Because at this time of year, you can expect:

  • September – Average daily highs in the state hover between 60°F and 70°F (15.6°C and 21.1°C) while daily lows sit between 45°F and 50°F (7.2°C and 10°C). And while there is a possibility of rain, it isn’t overly rainy at this time of year. Days are also quite long since sunrise is around 6:30 am and sunset is around 7:04 pm.
  • October – Once October rolls around, it is the start of the snowy season in Vermont. Although truth be told, most areas throughout the state really only get around 0.28″ (7mm) of snow this month, so no heavy snow gear is needed.  Do pack a coat though since daily highs are between 52°F and 41°F (11.1°C and 5.0°C) while daily lows are between 38°F and 27°F (3.3°C and -2.7°C). Days here are also still fairly long since sunrise is around 7:10 am and sunset is around 6:04 pm.
  • November – As the calendar hits November, days get much shorter and colder. Snow is also a bit more common since the state experiences an average monthly snowfall of around 6.1 inches. Daily highs also drop to between 40°F  and 50°F (4.4°C and 10°C). while daily lows are only between 20°F and 48°F (-6.7°C and 8.9°C). Days also get shorter in November since daylight savings time (on November 7th) means that sunrise is at 6:40 am and sunset at 4:32 pm. 

So, in short, do try to check out all the awesomeness that is Vermont any time between late September and mid-October, before the weather gets too cold and the fall foliage totally disappears (not-so-quickly sobs/dry heaves in the corner at the thought of missing this). 

Also, be sure to pack a nice warm coat since the cold weather can hit quite quickly throughout many parts of the state. Yep, consider this your friendly, Girl with the Passport warning. 

What is the best time to See Fall Foliage in Vermont? When Can I See the Leaves Change in Vermont?

Beautiful fall foliage in Stowe, Vermont.

Look, I’m gonna be totally real with you. The ideal time to see fall foliage in Vermont changes from year to year.

I mean, if it’s a warm year, foliage might peak in late October. And conversely, if it’s a cool year, leaf-peeping time might be ideal in late September.

So yeah, the short answer is to check the weather because it’s hard to know. However, generally speaking, the best time to see fall foliage in Vermont is – going from north to south – between mid/late September and mid-October.

Therefore, visit Vermont at this time of year and you can enjoy a kaleidoscope of vibrant fall colors that will pop up all around you. 

Where Should I Go in Vermont in the Fall?

An aerial view of foliage around Stowe Vermont in the fall.

Not gonna lie, there are an infinite number of amazing, quiet New England towns that you could visit this fall in Vermont. 

But, in an effort to make this article NOT War and Peace level long, I have narrowed this list down to five of my all-time favorite, super charming towns in Vermont.  

1. Manchester

Nestled at the base of the Green Mountains, Manchester is a beautiful spot all year round. But during Vermont in the fall, this little town is particularly stunning.

After all, there are towering mountains covered in red, orange, and yellow leaves surrounding Manchester!

Besides all of the fall colors, Manchester boasts adorable shops, cool museums, and cute craft fairs. So if you ever want to take a break from leaf-peeping, you’ll have lots of fun things to choose from.

2. Bennington

Like Manchester, Bennington is surrounded by the gorgeous Green Mountains. And when you add that natural beauty to the New England charm, this town becomes irresistible!

Just like the rest of Vermont, Bennington transforms in autumn. After all, fall in Vermont is absolutely stunning! While there, you can see the Bennington Battle Monument bathed in fall colors, visit Lake Shaftsbury, or even hike part of the Appalachian Trail!

3. Waitsfield

Waitsfield, Vermont is a tiny town at the start of the Green Mountain Byway, the famous fall foliage route. In other words, Waitsfield is a must-see area if you’re experiencing Vermont in the fall.

With fire-colored leaves, the flowing Mad River, and the unique Big Eddy Covered Bridge, Waitsfield looks like something right out of a fairytale!

While you might be tempted to spend your entire time in Waitsfield taking pictures of the natural beauty, there’s a whole lot more for you to do while you’re here.

You could grab a pint from Lawson’s Finest Liquids, dine on a fabulous burger at The Worthy Burger Too, and pop into the Madisonian Museum of Industrial Design for a bit of extra awesomeness.

4. Woodstock

With a population of just 3,000 people, Woodstock is one of the smallest Vermont towns on this list, and that’s its primary appeal!

During your time in Woodstock, you can experience a taste of small-town life. So, stay at a cute and cozy inn, wake up late, and leisurely enjoy a cup of coffee.

Then, when you’re good and ready, you can check out several local cheese companies, stroll past loads of adorable shops, and dine out at one of the area’s many fabulous eateries.

5. Stowe

If there’s one place you have to experience fall in Vermont, it’s Stowe. This little town is at the center of the fall foliage-laden Green Mountain Byway and embraces the fall vibe in every way possible.

You can drive, hike, mountain bike, kayak, or even take a tour through the vibrant fall leaves! A few of the best places to see fall foliage in Stowe include Mount Mansfield, Stowe Mountain Resort, and Smuggler’s Notch State Park.

If you’re hoping to intersperse your leaf-peeping with other activities in Stowe, you can also hike to Moss Glen Falls, take to the skies in a hot air balloon, or sample some divine sweet treats at Lake Champlain Chocolates.

How to Get to Vermont in the Fall

Fall foliage surrounding Jenne Farm in Vermont.

Honestly, if you’re planning to visit Vermont in the fall, I’d 110% drive there. I mean, Vermont may be known for a lot of things but its highly connected, wicked awesome public transportation system is not one of them.

Therefore, unless you’re planning to spend your entire trip in a big city like Burlington (Burlington is awesome but there are a ton of other things to see and do in Vermont), I’d definitely drive here so you can use your car to get around.

Otherwise, if you’re traveling from far away and it just isn’t feasible to drive here, then do try to rent a car upon arrival. Trust me, it’ll make getting around the great state of Vermont about 10,000 times easier. And yes, that’s obviously an exact figure.

Now, if you plan to fly into the state, I’m 99.9% certain you’ll be flying into Burlington International Airport. You could also technically fly into Rutland-Southern Vermont Regional Airport but it’s not as big and nice as its Burlington brother. 

Also, once at the airport, you can take purple line bus number 12 into Burlington. South Burlington, and to the University of Vermont. 

And while I always drove into Vermont, other ways that you could visit Vermont in the fall include:

  • Amtrak – Contrary to what you might think two different Amtrak train routes serve much of Vermont and travel to the state from NYC and Washington DC respectively. These trains will make stops along the way at stations like Essex Junction (Burlington)and St. Albans. Just do your research before booking since trains are known to be way more expensive than flying. 
  • Bus – There aren’t a ton of buses that go into and out of Vermont. But, one bus company does operate buses into and out of Vermont that stop at 18 different stations in the state.  Although, if you’re planning to do a. long-haul bus trip to and from the state, then Greyhound is your best bet. Tickets start as low as $38 one way to Vermont from NYC. But, obviously, fares vary based on where you are going and where you are departing from. However, if you have the time to spare, Greyhound buses make a great, low-cost alternative to taking a flight. 
  • Lake Champlain Ferries – While these local ferries won’t take you very far, they can take you across Lake Champlain and into upstate New York – making this a great day trip if you have a bit of extra time this fall in Vermont. You’ll find various ferries operating along Champlain from Grand Isle (VT) to Plattsburgh (NY),  Burlington (VT)) to Port Kent (NY), and Charlotte (VT) to Essex (NY). They also cost around $11.25 one way for you and your car.  

Pro Tip: Many train lovers take the Vermonter, a 13 hour, 45-minute passenger train that goes from Washington DC to NYC, Springfield, Essex Junction, and finally St. Albans. Trains depart on the weekend and Coach seats start at $82.00 one way. 

What to Pack for Vermont in the Fall

A white church surrounded by fall foliage in rural Vermont.

I’m not gonna lie to you, Vermont can be exceptionally cold in the fall, especially if you plan to visit towards the end of October and into early November. 

Therefore, to help you adequately prepare for the polar vortex of doom, here are some of the things you should be packing when spending fall in Vermont. 

And no, this list is in no way exhaustive since I could write an entire post about packing for Vermont in the fall. But, this list does cover most of the obvious things you’ll need for a trip to Vermont in the fall, minus obvious items like underwear, pants, shirts, toiletries, shoes, etc. 

Yeah, I feel like you have more than enough common sense to pack these things prior to the start of your trip. 

Pro Tip: Neutral layers, layers, and more layers are the key to packing for any trip to Vermont in the fall. This way, you can quickly and easily adjust your outfits to rapidly changing weather conditions. 

  • Hat – When the air turns crisp and the snow begins to fell ever so slightly, you’ll need a cozy – but stylish – hat to keep your head warm. And while I personally have worn just about every winter hat available for purchase on Amazon, this maroon, pom-pom hat from FURALK is definitely my absolute fave (I wear it in all my Insta pics). Not only is it adorable and super warm, but it’s affordable at less than $15 per hat and is exceptionally durable too. The pompom is laso removable (although I have no idea why you’d want to take it off) and the maroon color photographs well too, you know, in case you’re a hardcore Instagram maven like me (totally joking). 
  • Textured Sweater – Once November rolls around, you’re gonna want to have a nice warm sweater to snuggle up in this fall in Vermont. So,  try packing an uber-stylish, textured sweater like this one right here. I dunno about you but I personally adore the details on the sleeves of this sweater, which also happens to come in just about every color of the rainbow. It also has a flattering silhouette (thank flipping goodness), will actually keep you warm, and is exceptionally well-priced at under $30 each. Yup, that’s $30 well-spent indeed. 
  • Black Boots – Not gonna lie, I absolutely love this insanely awesome pair of black boots from DREAM PAIRS. It’s a more than a little random company but I’ve purchased shoes from them loads of times and have never had any complaints. That’s because their shoes are always great since they’re comfortable, keep your feet warm, last forever, and are pretty dang cheap at under $60 a pair. They’re just not great for hiking. So, if you’re looking for a good pair of hiking boots then check out these waterproof women’s hiking boots from Columbia.
  • Water Bottle – If you’re going to be getting super outdoorsy this fall in Vermont then you’ll absolutely need a solid water bottle to help you stay hydrated. And that’s where this Nefeeko Collapsible Water Bottle comes in mighty handy. I also love that it’s collapsible and easy to pack when you’re not using it to store water. Plus, it’s good for the environment will save you money on bottled water. costs less than $15, has a leak-proof body, is made from BPA-free plastic, and has a carabiner to help you attach it to your backpack. If you want, you can even use it in tandem with a life straw so that you can safely drink unfiltered water while 
  • Scarf – Not only do scarfs help you look DAMN good, but they definitely warm you on a cold, fall day. And this one from Wander Ago is one of my faves because it comes in a stunning, plaid design that is perfect for fall. plaid pattern. It’s also created using an incredibly soft material that feels really lovely when rubbing up against your skin. It’s also exceptionally long and costs under $10, making it basically the best scarf ever. 
  • Flannel Shirt – Honestly, nothing really embodies the whole “fall in New England” spirit quite like a super snazzy flannel shirt. So, if you’re desperately seeking a flannel shirt to add to your wardrobe, then consider this one right here. Not only is the fit great but it costs less than $25 and comes in a variety of different patterns. It’s also pretty dang durable so you won’t have to get a new one after you frolic through the leaves in Vermont. 
  • Black Leggings – I love these leggings for fall in basically any place I visit because they are fleece lined – which will help keep you extra warm – and cost less than $20 a pair. They also have this control top waist that will help keep everything secure (if you know what I mean) but don’t look like gross gym pants that you just threw on at the last minute. No, they look like legit, fashion-forward leggings that you’ll feel great wearing.  And while I try to steer clear of jeans since they are known to hold onto odors, I can’t hate on the look and style of these Levis if you need a rockin’ pair of jeans. 
  • Backpack – This is without a doubt one of my all-time fave backpacks since I’ve taken it all around the world and it has never let me down.  I also love that it’s exceptionally stylish but still a functional, antitheft day bag that will help keep all of your belongings safe. As a result, I never really leave home without my super-nifty, Kenneth Cole Backpack. Especially since you can hold onto it forever (I’ve been using mine for 2+ years),  it costs under $60, and can hold a massive, 15′ laptop.
  • Women’s Fall Jacket – While it can get super cold in Vermont, you probably won’t need a hardcore winter jacket if you’re visiting earlier in the season. As a result, you may want to use a warm, fashionable fall jacket that is also long enough to keep your bum nice and toasty. And this jacket right here ticks all the boxes since it’s a warm, cotton puffer coat that comes with a fantastic, removable, faux fur collar. Additionally, this coat is available in ten different colors and comes with a fantastic silhouette (complete with a cinched waist belt) that will help you look great all day every day.  

Top Things to do This Fall in Vermont

A lake in Vermont with a dock and fall foliage all around it.

Trust me, there is no shortage of amazing things to do this fall in Vermont. That’s why you’re the biggest problem will deciding where to go and what to do first.

Especially since you probably don’t have time to take a solid two or three months off work so that you can go out and explore the entirety of Vermont. 

Therefore, to make your life – and trip planning – a whole hell of a lot easier, here are my picks for some of the best things to do this fall in Vermont. 

1. Drive on the Green Mountain Byway

By far the most famous thing to do each fall in Vermont is drive on the Green Mountain Byway, aka Route 100. This famous scenic route provides some of the best views of fall foliage in the entire state – or even in all of New England!

This route starts in Waterbury, crosses through Stowe, and makes a large loop through Morrisville and Jeffersonville before returning to Stowe.

All in all, the Green Mountain Byway is about 72 miles. Yes, my friend, that’s a whole hell of a lot of vibrant and super colorful leaves to enjoy!

And while these gorgeous autumn colors permeate the entire 72-mile drive, some leaf-peeping spots are better than others.

So, you should definitely consider making stops at Waterbury Center State Park, Smugglers’ Notch State Park, and Moss Glen Falls to see some of the best fall foliage in Vermont.

Plus, while most of the beauty of the Green Mountain Byway in the fall comes from the leaves, there are other non-leaf-related stops that you can make as well.

I mean, you could stop and munch on some fabulous apple cider donuts from Cold Hollow Cider Mill, grab a scoop from the Ben & Jerry’s ice cream factory, or pop into the Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum.

2. Hike to the Top of Camel’s Hump

Camel's Hump is a mountain in Vermont that is loaded with stunning fall foliage

If you’d like to find a more active way to see the beauty of Vermont in the fall then you’ll want to head to Camel’s Hump!

Because even though there are lots of hiking trails in Vermont that are perfect for leaf-peeping, Camel’s Hump stands out from the crowd for a couple of reasons.

First of all, Camel’s Hump is a whopping 4,083 feet tall. This makes it the third tallest peak in Vermont, which means that you can admire stunning, 360-degree views of fall foliage from the top. Yup, you really can’t ask for a better viewpoint!

Another feature that adds to Camel’s Hump awesomeness is the fact that it has three different trails that start at two different points.

So regardless of whether you’re in Duxbury or Huntington, you can easily make your way to the top of the peak. Just make sure that you go back down the same way you came up!

The next logical question is, of course, which trail should I take to get to the top of Camel’s Hump? And the answer to that question depends on the kind of hiking experience you’re looking for.

If you’re starting in Duxbury, you can enjoy the lengthy 6.6-mile Monroe Trail or the extra challenging (read: involves rock climbing) Dean Trail.

If you’re looking for a more family-friendly option, you’ll want to start in Huntington and tackle the 4.2-mile roundtrip Burrows Trail instead.

3. Find Your Way Out of the Great Vermont Corn Maze

Contrary to popular belief, there’s a lot more to fall in Vermont than just bright red leaves! There’s also quite a lot of produce for you to harvest in the fall, including corn.

But rather than picking this snackable vegetable, you can find your way out of the Great Vermont Corn Maze instead.

Now sure, there are lots of different corn mazes in Vermont. I mean, it’s a classic fall festival activity so that makes total sense. But, no Vermont corn maze is better than the Great Vermont Corn Maze.

After all, this unique attraction holds the special title of being the biggest corn maze in all of New England! And with approximately 24 acres of corn to wander through, this maze takes visitors an average of two hours to complete.

So, get ready to tackle one of the CORN-iest challenges ever.

It’s also important to note that the Great Vermont Corn Maze is really only suitable for adults (or children and teenagers accompanied by adults).

Yes, many unaccompanied teenagers have found themselves lost in this extremely large corn maze. And if that ends up happening to you, you could always just use the nearby emergency exit trail to get out real quick.

4. Pick a Bushel of Apples at Hackett’s Orchard

Bushels of freshly picked red and green apples that you'll find in Vermont in the fall.

Corn certainly isn’t the only crop that’s ripe for the picking every fall in Vermont. Because the apples are totally ready too! And while there are a few different orchards in Vermont, Hackett’s Orchard is probably the most popular.

In total, Hackett’s Orchard grows a whopping forty-seven different varieties of apples. So whether you prefer Honeycrisp apples, McIntosh apples, or one of the many other varieties available, you’re sure to find one that you’ll enjoy.

If you like, you can even take an awesome tour of Hackett’s Orchard during your visit too.

Although, if you’re not quite ready to leave Hackett’s Orchard after picking a bushel of apples and taking a tour, you certainly don’t have to!

Instead, stay for a while and savor a few apple-centric treats, like apple cider donuts, apple cider, apple cider slush, and apple crisp.

Simply put, you can easily spend an entire day enjoying the apple-inspired goodness of Hackett’s Orchard.

5. Eat an Absurd Number of Apple Cider Donuts

Vermonters aren’t content simply leaving all of the apples in their bushels. Instead, many locals transform these sweet fruits into apple cider – and then transform them again into apple cider donuts – a scrumptious, supremely fluffy, sweet dessert that you definitely don’t want to miss.

Now, there are a few noteworthy places to get apple cider donuts in Vermont, including Hackett’s Orchard, Shelburne Orchards, Champlain Orchards, and Sam Mazza’s Farm Market.

But, my personal favorite is Cold Hollow Cider Mill. Not only can you enjoy this sweet treat, but you can also learn about the apple cider-making process by taking a fascinating factory tour.

6. Pick Out a Pumpkin for a Jack-O-Lantern

A field full of pumpkins with a wicker basket for pumpkin picking this fall in Vermont.

We already know that fall in Vermont brings loads of corn and apples. But it also brings loads of pumpkins! And if you happen to be in Vermont in October in particular, you can use these pumpkins to create Jack-O-Lanterns that are absolutely perfect for Halloween. You can try to carve a classy toothy grin, an adorable emoji ghost, or – if you really want to test your skills – your favorite animated character!

But in order to transform your pumpkin into an artistic masterpiece, you’ll first need to pick a pumpkin. Luckily, there are quite a few pumpkin patches in Vermont that are perfect for that. You can check out Cedar Circle Farm, Isham Family Farm, Parker Family Farm, or Winslow Farm.

7. Enjoy a Scenic Train Ride

So far on this list of the top things to do this fall in Vermont, I’ve included seeing the fall foliage both by car and on foot. But, you can actually see these brightly colored leaves by train as well!

Yup! The adorable historic trains of the Green Mountain Railroad depart from Chester, Vermont, and happily chug their way through bright red, orange, and yellow leaves.

And depending on which train ride you book, you could end up in Rockingham, Rutland, or back in Chester.

Personally, though, my favorite scenic train ride is the Pumpkin Patch Express. Because in addition to seeing all of the fiery leaves of fall, you’ll also get transportation to an amazing little pumpkin patch. You can even take a pumpkin home with you, making for a truly unforgettable trip to Vermont in the fall!

8. Kayak in the Waterbury Center State Park

girl kayaking

You don’t have to be on land to see the beautiful Vermont fall foliage. You can take to the water too!

Just picture it: You and your kayaking buddy are in your bright orange kayak (you know, so you can match the fall leaves), paddling slowly through the calm lake.

You see a couple of other kayakers off in the distance, but, all in all, you get to enjoy the beauty of nature all by yourself. You listen to the water softly lapping up against the shore, feel the welcome bite of the chilly autumn air, and admire the leaves rustling in the breeze. It’s an absolutely breathtaking experience.

As for where to rent a kayak at Waterbury Center State Park, you can check out Umiak Outdoor Outfitters.

And if Waterbury Center State Park is a little too out of your way, don’t worry! There are lots of other places to go kayaking this fall in Vermont, inclduing Brighton State Park, Emerald Lake State Park, Shaftsbury State Park, and Silver Lake State Park.

Where to Stay this Fall in Vermont

The mountain cabins and scenic views that make the Traps Family Lodge one of the most romantic getaways in Vermont.

Good news travel fans! Shake a stick and you’re sure to stumble upon a beyond gorgeous Vermont bed and breakfast that you’ll basically never want to leave. 

No, really, I am not exaggerating. Because Vermont really is home to some of the cutest hotels that I ever did see. It also doesn’t hurt that they all seem to serve warm, freshly baked blueberry muffins for breakfast. 

And If you don’t want a fresh blueberry muffin for breakfast then, well, I think you’re just lying to yourself. Unless of course, you’re allergic, then it’s totally understandable. 

Anyway, to help you find some of the best places to stay during fall in Vermont, here are my picks for top accommodations that you are your family are sure to love. 

  • Trapp Family Lodge (Stowe, $200 per night) – If the name of this Austrian-inspired lodge in Stowe sounds a bit familiar it’s probably because, like me, you’ve seen The Sound of Music more times than you can count. Yes, this stunning, high-end resort actually shares a name with that iconic singing family and features lavish rooms with refined/comfortable style that are all located near some of the area’s best ski trails. Bavarian-inspired suites here also come with whirlpool tubs, plush towels, flat-screen TVs, private balconies, and more. Plus, guests have access to supremely fun on-site amenities like a European-style restaurant, a bakery, a brewery, a wine cellar, three heated pools, and even tennis courts.
  • The Woodstock Inn and Resort (Woodstock, $200+ per night) – With 142 different rooms to choose from, you’ll have no trouble finding availability at this 4.5-star hotel in Woodstock, Vermont. It’s also the perfect place for a bit of pampering since all of the vintage-inspired rooms here come fully outfitted with chic marble bathrooms, iPod docks, flat-screen TVs, Keurig coffee makers, wicked fast WIFI, and fireplaces/private porches. Valet parking is also included with the price of your stay, as is a free shuttle to Suicide Six Ski Area. Add in nifty amenities like indoor/outdoor pools, a steam room, a golf course, tennis courts, a spa, and a fitness center and you might never leave.
  • The Inn on Putney Road (Brattleboro, $194 per night) – Located in ever-charming Brattleboro, Vermont, this enchanting French, Baronial-style home features six lovely, individually decorated rooms that include free breakfast (HOORAY), WIFI, flat-screen TVs, minifridges with complimentary drinks, four-poster beds, and even a fly like a G-6 working fireplace. And if you need to actually, you know, leave your room at any point, they also have fun things like a pool table, an on-site garden, and an indoor hot tub. Yup, dreams really do come true this fall in Vermont at the Inn on Putney Road
  • The Reluctant Panther Inn (Manchester, $200 per night) – Located smack dab in the center of town, this bad boy of the Vermont bed and breakfast world is known for its delicious, made-to-order, complimentary breakfast. However, if breakfast alone isn’t enough to lure you in here, they also have old-world-style rooms that basically put the comfort back in comfortable. Other luxe life services here include daily turndown service, in-room massages, and luxurious marble bathrooms making this the perfect place to spend fall in Vermont. 

Where to Eat this Fall in Vermont

Four different types of maple syrup from Vermont

If you’re looking for a foodie-minded foray this fall in Vermont, then you’re in luck. Because Vermont has plenty of amazing eateries for you to choose from. 

So, take a brief hiatus from all that leaf-peeping while enjoying Vermont in the fall and grab a trusty pair of extra stretchy, elastic waist pants.

Trust me, you’re gonna need them as you enjoy some of the best restaurants that the great state of Vermont has to offer. Just do me a solid and eat all the apple cider donuts possible. 

1. Cold Hollow Cider Mill

The red exterior of the Cold Hollow Cider Mill.

In addition to fire-colored leaves, fall in Vermont also boasts tasty apples that are ripe for the picking. These delicious apples can then be turned into refreshing apple cider.

And while you can find fantastic apple cider at loads of Vermont eateries, I recommend heading to Cold Hollow Cider Mill in Waterbury, where you can get your apple cider straight from the source.

While at Cold Hollow Cider Mill, you can also visit the cider mill and even sample some cider in the tasting room and accompanying restaurant.

The tasting room is great for adults since this is where you can try several different types of hard cider, which are made right there on the property. 

And If you want to learn how to make cider before you sample it, I highly recommend taking a tour of the cider mill. 

Afterward, you can sit down for a full meal at the Cold Hollow Cider Mill restaurant. Open for both breakfast and lunch, this Vermont restaurant uses as many high-quality, locally sourced ingredients as possible.

My personal faves include the morning core sandwich for breakfast ($5.50) or the chicken pesto panini for lunch ($9.95). You also certainly can’t forget to order the apple cider donuts ($1.50 each) before you go!

2. The North Hero House Restaurant

There are a few different things that make The North Hero House Restaurant stand out from the crowd. First, there’s its location. It’s actually located on North Hero Island in the middle of beautiful Lake Champlain.

More specifically though, it’s nestled in the charming The North Hero House Inn. FYI though, The North Hero House Restaurant is definitely one of the fancier restaurants in Vermont.

So, expect to find pressed white tablecloths and artfully crafted plates that make this an ideal stop for a special occasion.

And last but certainly not least, there’s the food. Enjoy the seared scallops ($16), the pan-roasted duck breast ($28), or the fish & chips ($19). Then, finish it all off with a mouthwatering dessert, like the maple pecan cake ($7) or vanilla creme brulee ($7).

3. The Inn at Shelburne Farms

Barn at Shelburne Farms that is surrounded by beautiful fall foliage.

If you love farm-to-table restaurants, you’ll love dining at The Inn at Shelburne Farms. With their commitment to sustainability, The Inn at Shelburne Farms’ menu depends on what is harvested from their market garden.

And since there’s no set menu, that means that every visit is filled with delightful, farm-fresh surprises!

However, if the high-quality ingredients alone aren’t enough to convince you to dine at The Inn at Shelburne Farms, the location just might.

Because this awesome eatery sits inside a stunning Victorian mansion that is nestled along the shores of Lake Champlain, meaning that the setting here is almost as amazing as the food itself. 

4. Hen of the Wood

The Inn at Shelburne Farms isn’t the only noteworthy farm-to-table restaurant in Vermont. As a matter of fact, there are quite a few of them, including Hen of the Wood.

In fact, this eatery is so popular that there are now two Hen of the Wood locations – one in Waterbury and one in Burlington – but I highly recommend dining at the original restaurant in Waterbury – at least if you have a choice.

Now, when the first Hen of the Wood first opened in 2005 – in an old grist mill – Chef Eric Warnstedt helped the restaurant win many James Beard Foundation Awards, forever securing its reputation as one of the best restaurants in Vermont.

And because this Vermont eatery has won so many prestigious awards, it’s no surprise that it’s easily one of the fanciest restaurants in the state.

So, when you dine here, you’ll get to dress up and savor some of the best food of your life. Try the family-style duck breast ($70), the hanger steak with creamy bechamel sauce ($34), or the fresh halibut with pac choi ($38).

Just do yourself a favor and make a reservation If you plan on dining at Hen of the Wood this fall in Vermont since this eatery is more than a little popular. 

5. The Worthy Burger

A kimchi burger from Worthy Burger in Vermont.

So far, this list of where to eat this fall in Vermont includes quite a few restaurants that are on the fancier side of things. But, the cool thing about Vermont’s dining scene is the many of the state’s best restaurants can be either classy AF or totally chill beyond belief.

And The Worthy Burger is for sure the latter of two. Although, it’s still 110% worth a visit.

Because if you’re looking for a juicy burger and a refreshing beer, The Worthy Burger may be the best place to go in all of Vermont.

So, feel free to order the worthy burger ($14), the chicken-out ($14), or the turducky ($15) to satisfy any and all of your most fervent, burger-related cravings.

And while you’re waiting for your top-notch burger to come out, you can sip on a cold, refreshing, locally sourced beer ($6-$8).

The Worthy Burger also has two locations, one in South Royalton and one in Waitsfield.

6. American Flatbread

If you’d rather have pizza than burgers, American Flatbread is the place to go. But unlike most pizza places, the focus at American Flatbread isn’t on toppings. Instead, it’s on the dough.

And the dough at American Flatbread is nothing short of amazing since it’s made with the highest quality ingredients and baked in a primitive wood-fired earthen oven.

The result is a light, flavorful crust that’s absolutely amazing. Then, once you have this scrumptious, fluffy base to work with, you can add delicious toppings.

So, feel free to either make your own pie or choose from one of the pre-chosen topping combos, like the dancing heart (small: $7, large: $11), the new Vermont sausage (small: $13, large $20), or the power to the people (small: $14, large: $23).

FYI, American Flatbread also has locations in Burlington, Middlebury, and Waitsfield.

7. Michael’s on the Hill

Salad with fresh cheese and pecans from Micheal's on the Hill

Michael’s on the Hill is run by critically acclaimed chef, Michael Kloeti, who was actually Vermont’s first-ever chef of the year!

And with his classic culinary training, European roots, and locally sourced ingredients, there’s no question as to why he won this prestigious award!

Also, Chef Kloeti is so committed to getting the best ingredients and supporting the local community that he actually consults with local farmers about future menus!

That’s why you really can’t go wrong with anything from Michael’s on the Hill. To get the best bang for your buck though, I recommend experiencing the Gold Tasting Menu, which includes 5 scrumptious courses for just $49 per person.

Now, while the food alone is certainly enough to draw in the crowds, Michael’s on the Hill’s location certainly adds to the charming ambiance.

It’s Situated in a charming, 1820s farmhouse in Waterbury, making this eatery the epitome of cute and cozy.

8. Misery Loves Co.

Initially, Misery Loves Co.’s unique name is what really catches your eye. But, it’s the fantastic food that’ll get you to stick around.

Now, like many other fantastic restaurants in Vermont, Misery Loves Co. in Winooski embraces the farm-to-table mindset.

As a matter of fact, Misery Loves Co. sources most of its produce from its own farm on North Hero Island. This means that you can’t go wrong when ordering basically any dish on the menu, whether it’s the aged pheasant ($26), the duck a l’orange ($30), or the whole daurade ($36).

And, as an added bonus, Misery Loves Co. also serves up a delicious weekend brunch! So, be sure to stop by and try the MLC benedict ($14), the seafood benedict ($17), or the croque madame ($14) for the best foodie experience possible this fall in Vermont. 

9. Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Shop

Rainbow colored Ben and Jerry's Van

Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Shop in Waterbury is the perfect place for a sweet treat during your time in Vermont. After all, is there ever a bad time for ice cream?

And the correct answer to that question is of course, an emphatic now. So, go for a classic scoop of chocolate chip cookie dough or try the more adventurous whiskey biz.

Plus, on top of being a fabulous place to grab a scoop, Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream Shop is also connected to the Ben & Jerry’s factory.

Sp, while you’re here, you can actually take a tour of the factory and learn everything you’d ever want to know about the ice cream-making process.

10. Farmhouse Tap and Grill

Farmhouse Tap and Grill is a cool spot that features rustic wooden tables, industrial lights, crackling fireplaces, and charming chalkboard menus.

Therefore, you could easily spend several hours here sipping on drinks, eating delicious food, and having a lively conversation.

To make things even better, the menu at Farmhouse Tap and Grill also has something for everyone. So, dig into delicious menu items like the chilled P.E.I mussels ($7 for six, $13 for twelve), the misty knoll turkey burger ($17.95), or the slow-roasted Vermont pork shoulder ($26.95).

Additional Vermont Travel Resources You’ll Love

Well my Vermont-minded traveler, that just about concluded this epic guide to spending fall in Vermont. 

Tell me, did your favorite Vermont in the fall activities make the cut? If not then let me know in the comments below and I’ll be sure to have a look ASAP. 

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